It’s a kind of magic

I finally managed back out to the shed after around a 3 week absence, due to my guts and other commitments. It’s very off-putting trying to turn when you can’t bend over without stomach acid rushing into your mouth and ears. Nasty.
I survived round one of exploratory treatment, and the first set of biopsy results came back clear. New meds are helping, and I’m actually eating like a human being again for the first time in over a year.

I finished the holly wand I started turning several weeks ago. A little decoration and some spray on polyurethane.
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I’m not sure I would go to the trouble of decorating again however. It is very tedious, and I’m not all that patient.

I chucked up a piece of the oak I got from my visit to the tree surgeon. This started out around 5½” in diameter and around 3½” deep.
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There were a lot of cracks in it, which were stabilised using thin superglue. Unfortunately the stabilisation doesn’t work too well when you try to turn the inside larger than the outside and it parts company. Shame, I was liking the shape.
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It ended up being much more shallow than intended, but at least I managed to save it. There is some nice character on the timber, and the cracks are well enough sealed so it should stay together now.
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Cellulose sanding sealer brings out a bit of a shine. This stuff is made by Chestnuts, and I’m in 2 minds about it. I still think I prefer Bolgers brand to work with, but this does need fewer applications.
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I do like a nice piece of oak, even if it is hard as iron and splintery as hell to work.
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Remounting on a jam chuck allows me to flatten the bottom. No recess or tenon.

Finally from the weekend is a small yew dish which was gone before it even made it indoors.
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This one through some miracle managed not to blow apart, despite the crack in the bottom being right through. If you hold it up to the light you can see right through it.
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This one is roughly 3¾” in diameter by just under 1″ deep. I love working with yew, even if it is horribly toxic. This particular piece was cut at work around 5 years ago and has been drying in the shed since then.
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Jam chucked again to remove the tenon. Finish again is cellulose sanding sealer.

Hopefully this should be me back to relative normality and able to get out more regularly until winter sets in at least.

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